f

(Source: bestrooftalkever)

smugsbunny:

whoopsimightbegettingsued:

Welp

erinkkavanagh:

has this been done yet?

starkexpos also requested Clint Barton in palette 2

dislap:

exitmusicforafilmm:

crypticrose:

c-aramelize:

bur-gund-y:

c-aramelize:

living-afairytale:

c-aramelize:

so oxygen went on a date with potassium today…it went OK.

i thought oxygen was dating magnesium…OMg

actually oxygen first asked nitrogen out, but nitrogen was all like “NO”

I thought oxygen had that double bond with the hydrogen twins

looks like someone’s a HO

NaBrO

i’m done with all of you

So I finally found the science side

A racist woman is not a feminist; she doesn’t care about helping women, just the women who look like her and can buy the same things she can.

A transphobic woman is not a feminist; she is overly concerned with policing the bodies and expressions of others.

A woman against reproductive rights — to use bell hook’s own example, and an issue close to your heart — is not a feminist; she prioritizes her dogma or her disgust over the bodies of others.

An ableist woman is not a feminist; she holds some Platonic ideal of what a physically or mentally “whole” person should be and tries to force the world to fit inside it. —

An Open Letter to Caitlin Moran by Nyux

(via black—lamb)

(Source: redefiningbodyimage)

WiFi: connected
Me: then fucking act like it

nasturbate:

prosetitute:

I’M DYING

STOP HARASSING YOUR PARENTS but also keep doing it because i just laughed so hard my soul escaped my body

(Source: epic-vines)

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

kenway:

friendship necklaces where one says “eat” and the other says “ass”

fsckthesystem:

Goodnight everybody!!